Carl Horowitz

University of Michigan
Runs his own tutoring company

Carl taught upper-level math in several schools and currently runs his own tutoring company. He bets that no one can beat his love for intensive outdoor activities!

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Scientific Notation - Problem 1

Carl Horowitz
Carl Horowitz

University of Michigan
Runs his own tutoring company

Carl taught upper-level math in several schools and currently runs his own tutoring company. He bets that no one can beat his love for intensive outdoor activities!

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Changing numbers from scientific notation to standard notation, so how this works is it's all based on powers of 10. So 10 to the first is 10, 10² is 10 times 10, 100, so basically what this is saying is the number of zeros we are adding onto this statement.

You can multiply out 10 to the 4th and what you'd end up with is four zeros on the end, so what we can do is do the exact same thing taking this number here and basically moving the decimal place over four spots. So there will be 10 to the first, 10 to the second, 10 to the third, 10 to the 4th and then when you're done you just throw in your zeros and so what we would end up with is 83,100.

Negative exponents basically behave the exact same way, but going in the opposite direction, so you're going to move your decimal place five units in the other direction. So we go over we move it from the middle of the 3 and the 1, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 throw in your decimal and then fill in all the zeros needed.

So basically taking a number from scientific notation to standard notation, look at your exponent, if it's positive zeros, if it's a positive exponent you move your decimal to the right, if it's a negative exponent you move your decimal to the left.

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